George Standing in Christmas Trees

Yesterday was our annual “Picking Out the Perfect Christmas Tree” outing. The weather was gorgeous, the sun stunning, and I only heard one under-the-breath order to “shut it” (because they’re not allowed to say “shut up”) from one charming Willis child to another as we loaded into the Suburban.

On the way to the Christmas tree farm, I was lamenting the fact that “Table for Six: The Extraordinary Tales of an Ordinary Family” still wasn’t ready for public consumption. I peppered Chris with the usual questions…

Should it be in narrative form?

If so, should it be chronological?

Does is work as a series of essays?

Will anyone want to read it?

Should I just retire my typing fingers and become a stripper instead?

And his response?

“I think that what will make this book absolutely perfect is if you write the entire thing in third person.” And then he rolled his eyes and proceeded to turn up the Run-DMC Christmas carols. Because we’ve had this conversation approximately 3,268 times. Just this week.

“Yeah!” Sam chimed in. “Sam thinks you should always write in third person.”

“Gus agrees,” added my 11-year-old.

“Mary Claire thinks we should all stop for hot chocolate.”

“And George thinks he should receive lots of LEGOs for Christmas.”

And that is how the Third Person Trip To the Christmas Tree Farm Conversation began.

“Katrina thinks all her kids are smart asses — just like their father,” I interjected after a series of loud and unruly third person comments. “And because they are all irreverent and obnoxious, she is going to sing ‘Away in a Manger’ at the top of her lungs.”

“Noooo!” they all cried.

“Sam thinks he will die if he has to listen to that!”

But I did it anyway.

And just for the record, no one perished.

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